S/O Alaskan History Magazine

Sept-Oct 2020 issue

Order the Sept-Oct issue, sent postage paid, First Class Mail. In this issue: Wells Fargo & Co. in Alaska • McGreely’s Express • Roadhouses • Ray Mala: Alaska’s Hollywood Star • The Alaska Club • A Bibliography of Alaskan Literature, 1724-1924 • Ernest de Koven Leffingwell, Mapping the Arctic Coast • and much more! 

$12.00


In this issue:

• Wells Fargo & Co. in Alaska: Freighting in the Far North

• McGreely’s Express: 1898 Private Post Between Dyea and Skaguay

• Roadhouses of Alaska: A Good Meal and a Warm Place to Sleep

• Ray Mala: Alaska’s Hollywood Star

• The Alaska Club: A Seattle Social Club for Traveling Alaskans

• James Wickersham’s A Bibliography of Alaskan Literature, 1724-1924

• Special Feature: Ernest de Koven Leffingwell, Mapping the Arctic Coast

Order from Northern Light Media below or at Amazon

Digital Edition at Issuu

Posted in News & Information | Leave a comment

Josephine Crumrine

Updating articles at the digital magazine site again, working on the Sept-Oct, 2019 issue today, which included this piece about the beautiful sled dog portraits of Josephine Crumrine:

Alaskan History Magazine

SmokeyThe beautiful pastel paintings of Alaskan huskies by Alaskan artist Josephine Crumrine, reproduced by four-color lithography, graced the menu covers in the dining rooms of the Alaska Steamship Company during the 1940’s and ’50’s. One of these menus, depicting an Army sled dog named ‘Smokey,’ shown here, is on file at the Alaska State Library and available to view on the digital archives.

The Sept-Oct issue, 2019 issue of Alaskan History Magazine features an article about Josephine Crumrine and the Alaska Steamship Company menus, with several other sled dog portraits for which the artist became well known. You can read the entire article with all the full-color portraits at the Alaskan History Magazine’s issuu pages

View original post

Posted in News & Information | Leave a comment

Alaskan Roadhouses

Alaskan Roadhouses

Alaskan Roadhouses: Shelter, Food and Lodging Along Alaska’s Roads and Trails, by Helen Hegener

This 284-page book presents historic photos of dozens of individual roadhouses, along with the colorful histories are first-hand accounts of those who stayed at the roadhouses while traveling the early trails and roads of Alaska, including the Reverend Samuel Hall Young, Frank G. Carpenter, Judge James Wickersham, Leonhard Seppala, Col. Walter L. Goodwin, and Matilda Clark Buller, who opened a roadhouse near Nome in 1901, at the height of the Nome Gold Rush.

The following description is from Jim Reardan’s book, Sam O. White, Alaskan: Tales of a Legendary Wildlife Agent and Bush Pilot [Graphic Arts Books, 2014]:

Teams at Tonsina Roadhouse on the Valdez-to-Fairbanks Trail
Teams at Tonsina Roadhouse on the Valdez-to-Fairbanks Trail

“A man named Ohlson ran the Lone Star Roadhouse between Minchumina and McGrath. He had been a dog team driver, trapper, and prospector until old age caught up with him. He then settled down to winters in his roadhouse on the Fairbanks-McGrath trail, where he cooked and cared for overnight travelers. Hotcakes, bacon, coffee and two eggs (if you were man enough to take ’em before they took you) was $2.50. There was also moose and caribou stew, which was always good. At $2.50 per meal this was not at all out of line when considering the distance and transportation involved in getting the supplies there.”


Alaskan Roadhouses

"Alaskan Roadhouses, Shelter, Food, and Lodging Along Alaska's Roads and Trails," by Helen Hegener, published by Northern Light Media in 2016. 6" x 9", over 100 black/white photographs, 284 pages. $24.95 plus $5.00 for First Class shipping.

$29.95



Posted in News & Information | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

July-August, 2020

The July-August, 2020 issue is now available to read online at Issuu, and print copies are available for adding to your library collection.

This July-August issue of Alaskan History Magazine features the following articles:

• Septima M. Collis, author of A Woman’s Trip to Alaska, about her historically informative voyage through Alaska’s Inside Passage in 1890.

• Gavriil Andreevich Sarychev, a Russian sea captain who mapped much of the Aleutians. 

• Pioneer Farmers of the Matanuska Valley, the hardy souls who blazed the way in agriculture for south central Alaska.

• SS Dora, the doughty little sailing ship which carried mail, freight and passengers through some of Alaska’s roughest waters for close to half a century.

• C. C. Georgeson, the Special Agent in charge of developing Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations in Sitka, Kodiak, Rampart, Copper Center and elsewhere.

• Bicycles in Frontier Alaska, telling how two-wheeled adventurers rode in summer and winter, on local trips or journeying across the territory.

Special Feature in this issue: Gov. George Parks’ 1928 Airplane Tour of Alaska

Click here to order a print edition:

July-August, 2020

The July-August issue of Alaskan History Magazine, Volume 2, Number 4.

$12.00

Posted in News & Information | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Hudson Stuck’s Sled Bag

Ten Thousand Miles by Hudson StuckThe Episcopalian minister Hudson Stuck, known as the Archdeacon of the Yukon, published five books about his travels and adventures in Alaska, including Ten Thousand Miles with a Dog Sled, published in 1914.

In that book the photograph below appears, and a sled bag can be seen hanging from the handlebars. That sled bag is on permanent display at the University of Alaska Museum of the North in Fairbanks.

sledbag final

“Rough ice on the Yukon.”

The entire book is available to read online at Project Gutenberg, the photograph appears on page 335.

The catalog record for Hudson Stuck’s sled bag was shared with me by Patrick Dean, who is researching the history of the archdeacon’s life. That record includes a beautiful full-color image of the bag, along with details about it:


Screen Shot 2020-08-05 at 10.00.01 AM

Link to original. Photo credit: Barry J. McWayne, March 25, 2006.

07/28/04: Overall condition is good. Top of piece: Overall soiling, Decorated half – some stitches broken with beads missing, beads missing from edge, fading discoloration of yarn tassels, some tassels appear to be missing, Undecorated half – soiled, warble fly holes (near red cloth strip), fading and abrasion; Underside: some abrasions, stains (red, brown, black), general soil and grime.

culture of origin: Athabascan, Gwich’in [Angela Linn, 2020-06-19]

culture of use: non-Native 

description: Smoked moosehide; 52.7 cm (20 3/4″) x 47.6 cm (18 3/4″) widest point; heavy leather strap with metal buckle at top; front flap is 44.5 cm (17 1/2″) x 46.4 cm (18 1/4″); edged with red cotton material/white seed beads; beads on sides & bottom; some missing; inside of cloth edging is 2.54 cm (1″) strip of blue and white seed beads in triangle pattern; elaborate floral designs and large shield in center; has red cross with blue anchor on it. “HAEREO” at bottom of shield; 15 tassels of trade beads and wool around edge of flap; some missing. Carried on handlebars at back of sled.
materials: Moosehide, smoked Beads, glass Textile Metal
Used by Archdeacon Hudson Stuck (died 1920). Left at St. Stephan’s mission by Dr. Grafton Burke. There is a photograph showing this pouch in use on a sled in Stuck’s book (published 1914), Ten Thousand Miles With a Dogteam. *On perm. exhibit; Interior Gallery, beadwork. Removed from INT08, July 2004. *Selected for RBAAG. “HAEREO” is Latin and translates to “I Stick”, which was Hudson Stuck’s personal motto.


Posted in Alaska History, Books, missionaries, photographs, Sled Dog History | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alaskan Roadhouses

Alaskan RoadhousesAlaskan Roadhouses: Shelter, Food and Lodging Along Alaska’s Roads and Trails, by Helen Hegener

This 284-page book presents historic photos of dozens of individual roadhouses, along with the colorful histories are first-hand accounts of those who stayed at the roadhouses while traveling the early trails and roads of Alaska, including the Reverend Samuel Hall Young, Frank G. Carpenter, Judge James Wickersham, Leonhard Seppala, Col. Walter L. Goodwin, and Matilda Clark Buller, who opened a roadhouse near Nome in 1901, at the height of the Nome Gold Rush.

The following description is from Jim Reardan’s book, Sam O. White, Alaskan: Tales of a Legendary Wildlife Agent and Bush Pilot [Graphic Arts Books, 2014]:

Teams at Tonsina Roadhouse on the Valdez-to-Fairbanks Trail

Teams at Tonsina Roadhouse on the Valdez-to-Fairbanks Trail

“A man named Ohlson ran the Lone Star Roadhouse between Minchumina and McGrath. He had been a dog team driver, trapper, and prospector until old age caught up with him. He then settled down to winters in his roadhouse on the Fairbanks-McGrath trail, where he cooked and cared for overnight travelers. His supplies arrived in the spring to be put on the only boat that would take them to Lake Minchumina. There they remained at Minchumina until October when a dog team could freight them to Lone Star over the trail. Hotcakes, bacon, coffee and two eggs (if you were man enough to take ’em before they took you) was $2.50. There was also moose and caribou stew, which was always good. At $2.50 per meal this was not at all out of line when considering the distance and transportation involved in getting the supplies there.”


Alaskan Roadhouses

"Alaskan Roadhouses, Shelter, Food, and Lodging Along Alaska's Roads and Trails," by Helen Hegener, published by Northern Light Media in 2016. 6" x 9", over 100 black/white photographs, 284 pages. $24.95 plus $5.00 for First Class shipping.

$29.95



Posted in Alaska History, Books, News & Information, Roadhouses | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alaskan History Magazine News

M:J 2020 cover smallAlaskan History Magazine, published bimonthly by Northern Light Media, will continue publication in a digital format, available to read or download free, with print editions available as single issues.

For details, see the Alaskan History Magazine website.

The issues are available to read free at the premier digital publications site, issuu.  Print issues can be ordered from Northern Light Media, $10.00 each postpaid. See the link in the menubar above for ordering information.

Posted in Alaskan History Magazine, News & Information | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Suspension

Small M:J cover

Alaskan History Magazine has been suspended for an indeterminate length of time. With only one year of publication, Alaskan History Magazine has been too fragile to survive the catastrophic impact of the worldwide Covid-19 pandemic. Back issues are still available. For more information click here.

Posted in Alaskan History Magazine, News & Information | Tagged | Leave a comment

Leonhard Seppala House

SeppalaBanner4-2(1)An update on the Leonhard Seppala House in Nome:
Resized_20180612_224232The Leonhard Seppala House was named as one of the Ten Most Endangered Historic Properties for 2020 by the Alaska Association for Historic Preservation, Inc., which is dedicated to the preservation of Alaska’s prehistoric and historic resources through education, promotion and advocacy. Preservation of the built environment provides a vital link and visible reminder of the past, emphasizing the continuity and diversity of Alaska.

AAHP aids in historic preservation projects across Alaska and monitors and supports legislation to promote historic preservation, serving as a liaison between local, statewide, and national historic preservation groups.

Leonhard Seppala House Property Description: The building itself is fully intact but in need of total repair. Logs used for foundation are badly rotted and need replaced. Tin roof is over 50 years old and bend and peeled back and needs replaced. Doors have been off the building and entrance has been boarded shut with plywood as are the windows. So these will need to be redone. The clapboard side is original and shows sign of wear from being wind blown and OLD but useable to show originality of the facility. Interior needs total restoration and since no electric is there, it will need to be added, as will a bathroom, and everything brought up to code.
Screen Shot 2020-04-25 at 10.02.02 PMProperty history: This is the house that Leonhard Seppala lived in while he was in Nome Alaska during the 1925 Diptheria Epidemic that threated the population of Nome. It was also the house that Leonhard lived in while he owned Balto, Togo and Fritz; the dogs that ran the famed Serum Race to Nome.
Why is property endangered? It has been vacant for a decade and not well kept. It was set for demolition by the City of Nome due to it becoming a fire hazard and a place for homeless to hang out.
Screen Shot 2020-04-25 at 10.42.53 PMActivities under way to save property: In July of 2018, the owner of the building; Urtha Lenharr set up a non profit, raised some funds thru donations and Nome City Share funds to have the building moved to a safe location keeping it from demolition. It is now being assessed for material needed to rebuild the structure and bring it up to Nome City Codes for a small museum in honor of Seppala and his accomplishments. The building will need a full restoration and relocation when finished.It is our goal to do this project in phases.
• Phase one was to save the structure from being destroyed.
• Phase two is to assess what is needed to start restoration.
• Phase three is to start gathering State, Federal, Local, and Individual contributions together to see of we can afford materials.
• Next Phase would be to establish a volunteer base to start.
defaultLeonhard Seppela was born in Skibotn, Norway on September 14, 1877. Seppala was brought to Nome by one of the famous Three Swedes, who founded gold near Anvil Mountain; Jafet Linderberg. In June of 1900, Leohard arrived in Nome.Leonhard Seppala is known for his infamous leaders: Togo, Balto, and Fritz. When Diptheria hit the costal village of Nome in 1925 and there was no way to get the life saving serum by boat or plane, Sepp was instrumental in organizing the Serum Run to Nome by Dog Team. With planes not running the only way to get the medicine to Nome was by ship from Seattle to Seward and then rail it from Seward to Nenana. Twenty dog teams had established a route to race it across the Seward Peninsula to Nome. Although Sepps dog, Balto (with dog driver, Gunner Kassan) brought the serum down the streets of Nome and received all the credit, Sepps’s lead dog, Togo actually ran Leonhard’s team the furtherest and the fastest during the grueling relay.
To see all of the 2020 Endangered Historic Properties, visit the Alaska Association for Historic Preservation, Inc. at https://alaskapreservation.org/gallery/ten-most-endangered-historic-properties/2020-ten-most-endangered-historic-properties/
The Leonhard Seppala House file:
Seppala Business Card 1
Posted in Alaska History, Gold Rush History, News & Information, Sled Dog History, Sled Dog Races | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rt. Rev. Peter Trimble Rowe

 

Peter Trimble Rowe 420

Peter Trimble Rowe
by Harris & Ewing.
Vintage bromide print, circa 1900s.

 The Right Reverend Peter Trimble Rowe D.D. (1856-1942), appointed first Missionary Bishop of the Espicopal Church in Alaska in 1895, crossed the Chilkoot Trail and tended the medical needs of the Klondike gold miners and the Native peoples, eventually founding hospitals, churches, and boarding schools throughout the territory.

 

Known as “the Trail Breaker,” Bishop Rowe traveled extensively across his vast diocese via dogsled in winter, in boats during the summer, and inspired his colleague, Hudson Stuck, Archdeacon of the Yukon, to publish three books dedicated in part to combating the exploitation of the Native peoples of Alaska.

Screen Shot 2020-05-05 at 4.02.46 PMA biography, The Man of Alaska: Peter Trimble Rowe (New York: Morehouse Gorham Co., 1945), was written by his friend, the Rt. Rev. Thomas Jenkins, who spent many years in Alaska under Bishop Rowe. The book covers the period of Alaska’s expansion, beginning with the Klondike gold rush in 1896 and ending around 1935. Rowe died in Victoria, British Columbia, in 1942.

Time magazine, December 4, 1939

479px-Peter_Trimble_Rowe

“The Right Rev. Peter T. Rowe, Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Alaska, Who Protests Against the Treatment of the North Accorded by the Federal Government.” January 1, 1911. [Photographer unknown. Photo:  Alaska-Yukon Magazine, March, 1911.] 



 

Posted in Alaska History, missionaries, News & Information | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment