Category Archives: Alaska History

Nov-Dec Alaskan History

The Nov-Dec issue of Alaskan History Magazine is now available! Articles in this issue cover a wide range of topics: Mottram Delany Ball • History of Fort Yukon • Episcopal Church in Iditarod • The Silent City • Nellie Cashman • 1922 Mushing Guide • The First American Musher in Alaska, by Thom “Swanny” Swan Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Alaskan History Magazine, News & Information | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Hudson Stuck’s Sled Bag

The Episcopalian minister Hudson Stuck, known as the Archdeacon of the Yukon, published five books about his travels and adventures in Alaska, including Ten Thousand Miles with a Dog Sled, published in 1914.

In that book a photograph appears, and a sled bag can be seen hanging from the handlebars. That sled bag is on permanent display at the University of Alaska Museum of the North in Fairbanks. Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Books, missionaries, photographs, Sled Dog History | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alaskan Roadhouses

This 284-page book presents historic photos of dozens of individual roadhouses, along with the colorful histories are first-hand accounts of those who stayed at the roadhouses while traveling the early trails and roads of Alaska, including the Reverend Samuel Hall Young, Frank G. Carpenter, Judge James Wickersham, Leonhard Seppala, Col. Walter L. Goodwin, and Matilda Clark Buller, who opened a roadhouse near Nome in 1901, at the height of the Nome Gold Rush. Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Books, News & Information, Roadhouses | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leonhard Seppala House

The Leonhard Seppala House was named as one of the Ten Most Endangered Historic Properties for 2020 by the Alaska Association for Historic Preservation, Inc., which is dedicated to the preservation of Alaska’s prehistoric and historic resources through education, promotion and advocacy. Preservation of the built environment provides a vital link and visible reminder of the past, emphasizing the continuity and diversity of Alaska. Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Gold Rush History, News & Information, Sled Dog History, Sled Dog Races | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rt. Rev. Peter Trimble Rowe

 The Right Reverend Peter Trimble Rowe D.D. (1856-1942), appointed first Missionary Bishop of the Espicopal Church in Alaska in 1895, crossed the Chilkoot Trail and tended the medical needs of the Klondike gold miners and the Native peoples, eventually founding hospitals, churches, and boarding schools throughout the territory. Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, missionaries, News & Information | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Alabama Claims

“The Alabama Claims were a series of demands for damages sought by the government of the United States from the United Kingdom in 1869, for the attacks upon Union merchant ships by Confederate Navy commerce raiders built in British shipyards during the American Civil War. The claims focused chiefly on the most famous of these raiders, the CSS Alabama, which took more than sixty prizes before she was sunk off the French coast in 1864.” Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, News & Information | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Togo’s Serum Run

As the worldwide fight against the coronavirus goes on we are reminded almost daily that pandemics and epidemics have happened before, and we have struggled through them with far fewer resources and much less medical and scientific knowledge than we have now. That is a very real comfort, and lends a bit of perspective to what we are facing. One such epidemic was a deadly diphtheria outbreak which raged across Alaska almost 100 years ago.  Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, News & Information, Sled Dog History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A People at Large

That more or less indefinite region north of the Yukon known as the Chandalar Country owes its name to one given by the early French-Canadian traders of the Hudson’s Bay Company to the singular native tribes that ranged there. Because these came from none knew where, recognizing no boundaries and taking to themselves no local designations, they were called gens de large––people at large. With peculiar fitness the name applies to all Alaskans, for in more ways than one we are a people at large. Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Books, News & Information | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Yukon Quest Trail

The 2020 Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race begins in Fairbanks at 11:00 am on February 1, and runs to Whitehorse, Yukon Territory; the Yukon Quest 300 starts at 3:00 pm the same day and runs to Circle, on the Yukon River. There are many exciting books about the race, and many written by the mushers who have run the race, but one book focuses on the trail between Fairbanks and Whitehorse, highlighting the incredible route followed by those mushers who accept the very real challenge of the Yukon Quest.  Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Book Reviews, Books, News & Information, Sled Dog Races, Yukon Quest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Congressional Records & the ARR

There are a wealth of historic resources at the website for my book on the Alaska Railroad construction from 1902 to 1923. Most of the resources I used in researching the history and writing the book are there.  Continue reading

Posted in Alaska History, Alaska Railroad, News & Information | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment